Plot Details for Smith and Shyamalan’s AFTER EARTH

By Jun 30, 2012 Comment (1)

After Earth

And here I was, hoping that M. Night Shyamalan has retired after the disastrous massacring of adaptation of one of the best animated Nickelodeon’s series. You know, Avatar: The Last Airbender. And no, I haven’t seen the movie with an already-made-up-negative opinion – actually, I was really happy when I’d heard about the adaptation. And then I saw the movie and wished I never did. If you have watched the series, you will know why and what I am talking about (mostly regarding the story – kinda the same thing Bradley Cooper is going to do to Hyperion… Bad idea, Bradley, bad! – though other aspects aren’t negligible, too).

Now, I might be a bit harsh in expressing my opinions (keep in mind that those are exactly what they are – personal opinions), but in that way I am less disappointed with bad movies and more glad when a good one comes along. The most important thing is to keep an open mind – which I hope I’m doing. Even if I’m ‘hating’ and ‘bitching’ about something.

Anyway. Yes, I was talking about his (sigh!) new movie, After Earth. (Ok, he had a pause in directing longer than usual two years, so maybe he got a good rest and now he’ll make it up for the abovementioned.) You might want to know that next month’s San Diego Comic-Con will include a panel on Saturday, July 14th, for this sci-fi flick starring Will Smith (why would you do that, man?) and his son, Jaden Smith.

Jaden Smith in After Earth

The panel description in SDCC’s schedule includes new plot synopsis, so don’t say later you weren’t warned about spoilers:

“In After Earth, one thousand years after cataclysmic events forced humanity’s escape from Earth, Nova Prime has become mankind’s new home. Legendary General Cypher Raige (played by Will Smith) returns from an extended tour of duty to his estranged family, ready to be a father to his 13-year-old son, Kitai (played by Jaden Smith). When an asteroid storm damages Cypher and Kitai’s craft, they crash-land on a now unfamiliar and dangerous Earth. As his father lies dying in the cockpit, Kitai must trek across the hostile terrain to recover their rescue beacon. His whole life, Kitai has wanted nothing more than to be a soldier like his father. Today, he gets his chance.”

The SDCC panel will include the film’s screenwriter Gary Whitta and cinematographer Peter Suschitzky, as well as the team behind the tie-in comic book After Earth: Innocence, artist Beni Lobel and writers Robert Greenberger and Michael Friedman. Peter David, author of the After Earth prequel novel, will also be there.

Hopefully, this might be his first good movie in… 12 years, first after the 2000′s Unbreakable (at the time, I didn’t pay attention to who directed it, so when I found out it came as a nice surprise for me, and I actually enlisted it among my favourites).

After Earth will be released on June 7th, 2013 and it will also star Orphan’s Isabelle Fuhrman.

Stay tuned!

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  • Alana Harmony says:

    Actually, what Shyamalan critics (really, that’s what they are) won’t tell you is that the story was written by Smith. That’s right, Will Smith wrote the story. He originally didn’t intend for it to be a sci-fi story. Well, it did change to one. Gary Whitta is the primary writer of the screenplay with Shyamalan adding input and revisions as needed, earning co-writer billing. The story concept is good. While not entirely new, adds some fresh elements and was promising in what it could have been. The directing was well done for what director had to work with; one star who delivers what is needed every time he’s on screen (and I honestly am not a huge fan of the older Smith, but can’t deny that the man is a very good actor). Other than that, the best performances are given by people that are seen for one scene (the injured soldier), in flashbacks (the deceased sister), and by the cgi animal creations! After that, the director us left with an actor of limited talent and range (who’s playing quite an annoying character to begin with). There were things in the film that was spectacular from the filming of the scenery to the few action scenes. Even some scenes where there was no action to speak of; the way things were filmed was done so in a way that takes advantage of every viewpoint to let the scenery tell a tale of it own. The slow pacing is because time is being taken to develop the characters (which it’s often lamented by critics that there isn’t enough of that in films in general and sci-fi films in particular) and it was only disappointing because the main character we’re forced to spend much of the movie with is so annoying and angers us so with his stupidity in the stories situations and the actor annoys us because he’s just ready to pull off the role in which he’s been placed (and when you pay $10+ for a movie ticket little tings like that get to you)! So, let’s not project our anger at one actor and the annoying character he’s playing onto those who don’t deserve it. Also, let’s not allow critics to manipulate us into brow beating their least favorite director when the fault is not his. Lastly, be sure that your dislike of a film actor, producer, screenwriter, or director isn’t bandwagon dislike! Just saying!

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